~ Samsung warns customers not to discuss personal information in front of smart TVs ~ [The Week] :: Samsung has confirmed that its “smart TV” sets are listening to customers’ every word, and the company is warning customers not to speak about personal information while near the TV sets. The company revealed that the voice activation feature on its smart TVs will capture all nearby conversations. The TV sets can share the information, including sensitive data, with Samsung as well as third-party services. :: #technology

http://godl.es/2m7UdrP

Networks and backups and bears, oh my

My new 15″ MBP arrived on Tuesday — life has gotten in the way of me doing much with it yet beyond transferring data — and it has me thinking about backups and network storage for my iTunes library.

Aside from BackBlaze, my local backup solution has been simply plugging in some USB drives every once in a while to do both Time Machine backup and SuperDuper cloning. But now I’m thinking that life would be simpler if I just had one or more drives attached to a router so that Time Machine was essentially always running and SuperDuping could be done more easily and often.

But it looks like most routers (especially the AirPort Extreme) have USB 2.0 ports, not 3.0, and so that limits disk access speeds. It might not make a difference given the bandwidth of a WiFi network, but it irks me nonetheless.

So, then I thought about getting an NAS device, which sounds like a cool, tech-y idea that would be sort of fun to set up. But, man, reading up on them and considering stuff like iTunes servers and other junk makes them seem way overkill for what I actually care about doing (backups and iTunes library).

Which brings me back to a decidedly un-nerdy solution: an Airport Time Capsule with one attached USB drive where I can store my iTunes library. The Time Capsule is attractive partly because I have a $100 credit with the Apple Store. And since I just want to off-load my iTunes library to a network drive, not actually set up any kind of media server, plugging in one of the many USB drives I already own, even via a USB 2.0 port, seems a more reasonable alternative than spending $500+ on a NAS.

Which, aside: The accumulation of external drives that rapidly become obsolete and unsellable is one of my least favorite things about Moore’s Law. Seriously, I have four external drives sitting on my desk at home right now.