#10RPGs — 9/10 Change — Runequest

It’s weird how often I will post about a game that I have honestly never managed to play (I tried once or twice in my youth and failed), but RQ stuck its tendrils into my brain around age 12 and has refused to let go. A classless RPG about a Bronze Age world with weird mythic, shamanistic color and no elves or dwarves and “orcs” (i.e., trolls) that were an important race that was as much ally as an enemy? Sign. Me. Up. There is something wonderfully organic about Glorantha, and RQ felt like a D&D where all of that cultural stuff outside the dungeon was honestly way more important.

Someday, I will get this to the table.

Ref: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+BrandRobins/posts/QQexibUjjMV

10 thoughts on “#10RPGs — 9/10 Change — Runequest

  1. Why do I always hear these stories about RQ/Glorantha? Why did (do) so many people worship it from it from a distance but never play it?

    I got hold of RQ2 and thought, this is cool, and GMed it for the next couple of decades. Sold my D&D books (and many others) to get more RQ stuff. Obviously that’s a bit ott but why didn’t people like you, Mark, just give it a whirl? Genuinely curious. It had really good backup material and until the late 80s the world hadn’t grown to such an intimidating depth.

  2. < ![CDATA[Why do I always hear these stories about RQ/Glorantha? Why did (do) so many people worship it from it from a distance but never play it? I got hold of RQ2 and thought, this is cool, and GMed it for the next couple of decades. Sold my D&D books (and many others) to get more RQ stuff. Obviously that’s a bit ott but why didn’t people like you, Mark, just give it a whirl? Genuinely curious. It had really good backup material and until the late 80s the world hadn’t grown to such an intimidating depth.]]>

  3. Jeff Zahari For me, as a kid and even as a teen/collegiate, I was simply the only person who’d ever even heard of the game, much less owned a copy. Added to that was my inability to figure out how to present new games to people.

    Me: “Guys, we should really play this!”

    Them: “Okay, let’s go.”

    Me: “Uh…”

    Not to mention, my circle of gaming friends was really small BITD. I had no clue how to use, say, Borderlands to run a game for one person.

    Now there is also the “Glorantha is really big, how do I learn it all” thing. But I am working on that.

  4. < ![CDATA[Jeff Zahari For me, as a kid and even as a teen/collegiate, I was simply the only person who'd ever even heard of the game, much less owned a copy. Added to that was my inability to figure out how to present new games to people. Me: "Guys, we should really play this!" Them: "Okay, let's go." Me: "Uh..." Not to mention, my circle of gaming friends was really small BITD. I had no clue how to use, say, Borderlands to run a game for one person.
    Now there is also the “Glorantha is really big, how do I learn it all” thing. But I am working on that.]]>

  5. Jeff Zahari Not that I can think of right now.

    What do you think made RQ easy for you to latch on to? What were you doing with it before you owned supplementary material? Were you ever running games with just the main book?

  6. < ![CDATA[Jeff Zahari Not that I can think of right now. What do you think made RQ easy for you to latch on to? What were you doing with it before you owned supplementary material? Were you ever running games with just the main book?]]>

  7. No, the first RQ game I ran was Gringle’s Pawnshop followed by the Rainbow Mounds, which came in the box (the Apple Lane booklet). I did use the encounter tables in the main book. Shortly after that I acquired Cults of Prax, Cults of Terror and Griffin Mountain. GM was the basis of the game for the next few months, after which the group dispersed. A while later I started up a new game with a new group using Borderlands.

    At that stage RQ was not greatly different from D&D in many ways. Rainbow Mounds is a dungeon crawl and Gringle’s Pawnshop is a straightforward defensive fight. Griffin Mountain is largely a wilderness hex crawl. Borderlands is mercenaries clearing territory for a noble. The differences lay in the system and the intriguing background baked into the scenarios. Rainbow Mounds is a weird dungeon crawl, for example, with the Lizard Mother and the adamantium pillar.

    I would suggest that this is still a good way for novices to ease into Glorantha. Much of the material produced since the 90s is guaranteed to overwhelm anybody who isn’t already an aficionado (and takes itself more and more seriously). Pretend it’s 1982 and you’ve only got a couple of sources. Let it grow as you play. It’s a fun world, it’s not just for historians and anthropologists.

  8. < ![CDATA[No, the first RQ game I ran was Gringle’s Pawnshop followed by the Rainbow Mounds, which came in the box (the Apple Lane booklet). I did use the encounter tables in the main book. Shortly after that I acquired Cults of Prax, Cults of Terror and Griffin Mountain. GM was the basis of the game for the next few months, after which the group dispersed. A while later I started up a new game with a new group using Borderlands. At that stage RQ was not greatly different from D&D in many ways. Rainbow Mounds is a dungeon crawl and Gringle’s Pawnshop is a straightforward defensive fight. Griffin Mountain is largely a wilderness hex crawl. Borderlands is mercenaries clearing territory for a noble. The differences lay in the system and the intriguing background baked into the scenarios. Rainbow Mounds is a weird dungeon crawl, for example, with the Lizard Mother and the adamantium pillar.
    I would suggest that this is still a good way for novices to ease into Glorantha. Much of the material produced since the 90s is guaranteed to overwhelm anybody who isn’t already an aficionado (and takes itself more and more seriously). Pretend it’s 1982 and you’ve only got a couple of sources. Let it grow as you play. It’s a fun world, it’s not just for historians and anthropologists.]]>