34 thoughts on “

  1. Gregor Vuga Yes, the former. I think rock has entered a phase where it’s largely enshrined and petrified, and all of the good (even innovative) stuff is happening where no one can see it.

    Thankfully, it is so damn easy to ignore the mainstream that I’m okay with all this.

  2. Mark Delsing my point being people have been decrying the death of rock since the instant it came into being, but such is the way of genres. Mozart and Bach would have torn their hair out if you told them they were making the same kind of music, but it’s all on the Best of Classical station these days.

  3. Adam D Sure, but to me, that kind of decrying is more like “[X] has totally sold out” or “They don’t write songs like they used to.”

    What I’m talking about is how rock is actually dead now.

    Classical music has been dead for a long time. Again, an art form can be dead and still loved.

  4. Part of what I was trying to get at, too, is these things are cyclical. Some genres do go away as a prominent, mainstream cultural force (jazz), but I wouldn’t say rock is dead forever, yet.

  5. I don’t agree! I think the difference between “they don’t write songs like they used to” and what you’re saying is a matter of scale, not a matter of substance.

    I also don’t agree that classical music is dead! Just that it’s not particularly popular any more, so its innovations and communication with the broader sphere of music is less-obvious, save to insiders.

  6. Adam D …its innovations and communication with the broader sphere of music is less-obvious, save to insiders.

    This is pretty much the definition of “dead” to me.

    I mean, jazz is the bedrock of instruction in contemporary music. You want to play anything rooted in 20th-century-and-beyond, you use jazz as your vector for learning music theory.

    Doesn’t make jazz any less dead.

    Robert Bohl Well, no one can see into the future, but for all intents and purposes, dead is dead. Future generations may revive rock, but it will be a part of something new.

    That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

  7. …its innovations and communication with the broader sphere of music is less-obvious, save to insiders. This is pretty much the definition of “dead” to me. I mean, jazz is the bedrock of instruction in contemporary music. You want to play anything rooted in 20th-century-and-beyond, you use jazz as your vector for learning music theory. Doesn’t make jazz any less dead. Robert Bohl Well, no one can see into the future, but for all intents and purposes, dead is dead. Future generations may revive rock, but it will be a part of something new. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.]]>