“From 1933, when Adolf Hitler was appointed chancellor of Germany, to his 1939 invasion of Poland, there was a significant movement both in the United States and worldwide to portray Hitler as a misunderstood genius whose everyday likability could better connect with the working class German people and lift the country from its post-war depression. Magazines and newspapers like the Times of London, The New York Times, The Saturday Review (‘Hitler at Home’) and even the American Kennel Gazette (‘Hitler Says His Dogs are Real Friends’) were more interested in Hitler’s interior design sensibility, his gustatory preferences, and his love of German Shepherds. […] The Hitler that Nobody Knows, a 1932 photo album, doubled as a behind the scenes peek into Hitler’s private life. With more than a hundred photographs taken by Hitler’s personal photographer, the book — which sold 400,000-plus copies by 1942 — meant to serve as a beacon proclaiming Hitler as the leader of the new Germany. […]

“Laurel Leff, a professor of history at Northwestern University, published Buried by the New York Times in 2005, examining the ways the Times either ignored or inadequately covered the Holocaust, partially due to a distaste among the editors for Zionism. In October 1935, the Times magazine included a fawning profile of Hitler as an architect, featuring his remodel of a small Bavarian cottage and its transformation into the fortress of Berghof, which was shown completed on the cover of a May 1937 issue.

“But perhaps the strangest Times article was ‘Herr Hitler at Home in the Clouds,’ written by Hedwig Mauer Simpson, the wife of Stanley Simpson, a British journalist and Munich-based correspondent for the New York Times and Times of London (she was a frequent contributor to the The Associated Press and The Daily Mail). […] Simpson rehashes worn tropes about Hitler’s vegetarianism, the long walks he enjoyed with his Alsatian dogs, and his love of the German people. The tick-tock of his daily routine is described down to the minute. Breakfast is at 9AM, lunch is served by ‘white uniformed butlers,’ and dinner is promptly at 8PM, with the ladies of the Berghof in evening dress and Hitler in English tweeds. In a rare step back from the festivities, Simpson writes that the setting contains ‘all the elements of exacting bureaucracy and secret-police efficiency.’

“The Times article was published on August 20, 1939, 11 days before Hitler’s invasion of Poland. Simpson would take one of the last peacetime trains out of Munich to London, and it appears she gave up writing following her departure from Germany. There is nothing in the article that suggests the chancellor, who ‘makes no secret of being fond of chocolate,’ has anything on his mind except the promise of an afternoon nap. Simpson clearly feels pampered and privileged to be in his presence. Whatever she felt on that last train out of Germany isn’t recorded here. […]

“Ordinary details can furnish a room, they can set a table, they can fill the time between hushed meetings of planned genocide or the quiet tapping at a computer, spreading hateful slurs to thousands of followers. If a writer can’t feel that fear, can’t show those feelings on a page, then all the reader is left with is Hitler at home.” (Longreads):

https://longreads.com/2017/11/30/when-newspapers-cover-the-private-lives-of-nazis/

When Newspapers Cover the Private Lives of Nazis

We’ve been hard at work on the new edition of Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay, and this week we’re going to be sharing the first big slices of news with you!

Release Date
There has been an amazing amount of excitement around Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition – we’re at the beginning of the journey but it’s already been a tremendous project thanks to the energy and enthusiasm of all the Warhammer fans we’ve been talking to since the project was announced. Thanks to you all for being awesome, and thanks for your patience waiting for news!

Design lead Dominic McDowall is on hand to tell us about the game’s development:

“The initial plan was to make some small updates to the awesome second edition, and that would mean we would be able to release the game in 2017. We’re all huge fans of the first and second editions of WFRP, and we wanted to take the game back to those roots.

“When I got into the guts of the game I started seeing more opportunities to add in some of the things we’ve learned over the years. This more creative direction meant a longer development phase. Games Workshop are extremely supportive of us taking the time we need to make WFRP Fourth Edition the very best game it can be, and so that’s what we did. I’m very excited about the way things have come together!

“The release date of Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition will be set for mid-2018, with a specific date to be set in a few months. Thank you for your patience while we invest the time to make the best game we can.”

We have some exciting events planned around the release date, so stay tuned for the latest new on those!

Covers
The initial releases for WFRP Fourth Edition will be a core rulebook and a boxed starter set. We’ve commissioned Ralph Horsley to paint a pair of covers for these which we’re very excited to share today! As you can see our desperate band have been enjoying some good times in Ubersreik, (or at least some of them have) before a familiar scene unfolds!

We’ll have more to share tomorrow, including news of the return of a multi-part campaign favourite from first edition, so keep an eye on our website and social media!

I just finished Netflix’s The Punisher and I think it may be the service’s strongest Marvel show yet, at least structurally. I think it’s the one show that starts strong and maintains a near-perfect arc across all thirteen episodes, even coming full circle in a cool narrative way. As much as I have loved most all of the the Netflix shows, this maybe the only one I’d consider near-flawless in execution.

I also feel — and maybe its just me — that the show does a great job of not glorifying the violence that Castle commits. I think almost all of the fight sequences are presented as being ugly and difficult, and I never got a Death Wish or Dirty Harry “isn’t this badass” vibe while watching.

On top of this, like JJ, the show is about more than what it’s about — the failure of US foreign policy, veteran PTSD, the alt-right, police violence — which is definitely a bonus.

I’ve never had any interest in The Punisher before Netflix’s take. I am totally not a fan of gun-toting “superheroes”, and I was really skeptical when it was hinted Netflix would be taking him on.

But man, I love this version. Maybe even more than the rest of the the Defenders.

In 1939, the German American Bund organized a rally of 20,000 Nazi supporters at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

NYC. All of these attendees are Americans.

“The footage is so powerful,” continued Curry, “it seems amazing that it isn’t a stock part of every high school history class. This story was likely nudged out of the canon, in part because it’s scary and embarrassing. It tells a story about our country that we’d prefer to forget.”

If you can’t see a resemblance between this and one of 45’s MAGA rallies, then I’m not sure how to help you.

More: https://fieldofvision.org/a-night-at-the-garden

https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/542499/marshall-curry-nazi-rally-madison-square-garden-1939/

Failure after failure — of economic, political, and social institutions. Fascism can’t rise all the way to power if strong, functioning, institutions work. Let’s review Germany again. Hitler never won a majority — power was given to him. Really: just handed over. The central bank gave up on managing the currency. Really: just gave up. Then there was Chamberlain, and so on. The media across the world was spellbound, and failed to warn properly of the horrors to come. If none of these things had come to pass, neither, maybe, would have World War II. But they did: institutional failures sow the seeds of fascism — and those institutions can’t then save societies from the very fascism they’ve helped create. What did Germany have to do after World War II? It had to build new institutions, write a new constitution, restructure the government, have war crimes tribunals, and so on. Scared? You should be! Intellectuals today aren’t taking any of this seriously, and this is what why they get it wrong, over and over again.

https://eand.co/fascisms-rising-in-america-because-america-doesn-t-understand-fascism-62cbb9ce7f4f