32 thoughts on “Why the Punitive Model of GMing Doesn’t Work

  1. I offer the kinder interpretation that it’s not that the author thinks its insightful so much as “Holy fuck, why do I have to explain this AGAIN”? I know I end up frequently struggling with the “Every year someone has been born who hasn’t seen the Flintstones” issue. And if there is one thing I can say with certainty, it’s that EVERY time I think that these “basics” are universal, I will be proven profoundly wrong by venturing even a little bit further afield than my usual circles.

    It’s tragic, but I genuinely dunno what the solution is.

  2. There needs to be a Cosmopolitan for baby gamers, with an editorial calendar that repeats on a 24 month cycle. Just drop in when you start, read the “Five tricks that will drive your GM wild” story, make it through to “Do you love stories that make sense? Take our quiz!” and drop back out when “Five tricks” cycles back around.

  3. Cosmopolitan for baby gamers, with an editorial calendar that repeats on a 24 month cycle. Just drop in when you start, read the “Five tricks that will drive your GM wild” story, make it through to “Do you love stories that make sense? Take our quiz!” and drop back out when “Five tricks” cycles back around.]]>

  4. Mythcreants doesn’t hit the mark 100% of the time for sure, but they do have some pretty good 101 level articles, and occasionally some fun “this is how airships would really affect your fantasy setting besides looking cool” kinda stuff.

  5. Everything old is new again in RPGS, otherwise the OSR would not exist.

    There are always new GMs/DMs/etc who have had only a few experiences. There are always groups who have not played in 20 years and are picking things back up and don’t know things have changed….
    And there are always BAD GMs returning to the fold who think the goal is to torment the players, lead them thru a railroad and crash the train into a brick wall at the end to show that they are smarter than everyone else.

    And there are always bored players, annoyed players, players who would rather be elsewhere but came along because a spouse/significant other dragged them there, players who don’t understand the game is not a dating service, players who can’t take anything seriously, players who want to play the quiet loner who refuses to work with the group, payers who’s goal is get as many side solo runs as possible, players who think they should always have the Mary Sue/Bruce Wayne PC, players who think its all about the treasure and will do anything to steal it all, players who can’t handle defeat, players who just want to end up in party conflict, players who want to conquer the world, players who want to burn the world, etc.

  6. Some gamers are teenagers. They may not as yet have developed the required social skills. And a quick review of any D&D FB group will see a lot of advice that amounts to: player tries something crazy, kill their arse. No, really, people still dispense that ‘wisdom’.