It’s not hard to draw a straight line from internet culture warriors’ misappropriation of free speech to our current mass delusions over climate change, the Hyde Amendment, abstinence-only education, health care as a luxury and class as a meritocracy. “Free speech” rhetoric begot “fake news,” which begot “alternative facts.”

Liberated from yadda yadda.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/07/01/opinion/sunday/save-free-speech-from-trolls.html?referer

10 thoughts on “It’s not hard to draw a straight line from internet culture warriors’ misappropriation of free speech to our current…

  1. The “shouting fire in a theater” example was used as a justification to arrest political dissenters and socialists and was later disavowed by the Supreme Court. Shouting fire in a theater is free speech, but you’re likely to get banned from the theater for life.

  2. < ![CDATA[The "shouting fire in a theater" example was used as a justification to arrest political dissenters and socialists and was later disavowed by the Supreme Court. Shouting fire in a theater is free speech, but you're likely to get banned from the theater for life.]]>

  3. I’m not sure what you mean. The Wikipedia entry is consistent with my clarification.

    “The phrase is a paraphrasing of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.’s opinion in the United States Supreme Courtcase Schenck v. United States in 1919, which held that the defendant’s speech in opposition to the draft during World War I was not protected free speech under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution.”

    War dissenters and socialists were the ones opposing the draft.

    “The First Amendment holding in Schenck was later partially overturned by Brandenburg v. Ohio in 1969, which limited the scope of banned speech to that which would be directed to and likely to incite imminent lawless action (e.g. a riot).”

    Shouting fire in a theater does not incite lawless action. Just panic. I can provide more links when it’s not midnight and my phone has more than a 5% charge.

  4. < ![CDATA[I'm not sure what you mean. The Wikipedia entry is consistent with my clarification. "The phrase is a paraphrasing of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.'s opinion in the United States Supreme Courtcase Schenck v. United States in 1919, which held that the defendant's speech in opposition to the draft during World War I was not protected free speech under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution." War dissenters and socialists were the ones opposing the draft. "The First Amendment holding in Schenck was later partially overturned by Brandenburg v. Ohio in 1969, which limited the scope of banned speech to that which would be directed to and likely to incite imminent lawless action (e.g. a riot)." Shouting fire in a theater does not incite lawless action. Just panic. I can provide more links when it's not midnight and my phone has more than a 5% charge.]]>