I love the Fearless Girl and I resent her. She’s an example of how commercialization can take something important and meaningful — something about which everybody should agree — and shit all over it by turning it into a commodity. Fearless Girl is beautiful, but she is selling SHE; that’s why she’s there.

Nuanced.

H/t Adam Dray

seriously, the guy has a point

14 thoughts on “I love the Fearless Girl and I resent her. She’s an example of how commercialization can take something important…

  1. I must admit, I find myself not caring. Since the whole thing is an advertisement stunt, the more people talk about it, the more free advertisement they get.

    Seriously, I would have never known about either statue without this controversy.

  2. < ![CDATA[I must admit, I find myself not caring. Since the whole thing is an advertisement stunt, the more people talk about it, the more free advertisement they get. Seriously, I would have never known about either statue without this controversy.]]>

  3. Bullshit. No one knows the SHE angle (thus the need to point it out), and in the future, no one will remember who it belongs to. The symbolism remains. The bull is about attempting to associate a toxic, violent image of masculinity with an insipid and vampiric activity like fiscal manipulation.

    The girl is about resistance to that.

    It doesn’t matter what the creators said. That’s the obvious thing this says. Not “buy SHE, whatever that is.”

  4. < ![CDATA[Bullshit. No one knows the SHE angle (thus the need to point it out), and in the future, no one will remember who it belongs to. The symbolism remains. The bull is about attempting to associate a toxic, violent image of masculinity with an insipid and vampiric activity like fiscal manipulation. The girl is about resistance to that. It doesn't matter what the creators said. That's the obvious thing this says. Not "buy SHE, whatever that is."]]>

  5. I agree with Robert and would add that, to me, as someone who is not anti-capitalist (despite what my right-wing friends think of my opinion regarding base human needs and rights), I think this is a positive thing. We ask business to act responsibly. Instead of Fearless Girl selling us “SHE” they could have started another hackneyed, insulting ad campaign where “average woman” faces the rigors of Wall Street and its boy’s club by treating herself to a pair of designer shoes. And long after the “SHE” campaign ends, the statue may continue to inspire if it stays as long as the bull has.

  6. < ![CDATA[I agree with Robert and would add that, to me, as someone who is not anti-capitalist (despite what my right-wing friends think of my opinion regarding base human needs and rights), I think this is a positive thing. We ask business to act responsibly. Instead of Fearless Girl selling us "SHE" they could have started another hackneyed, insulting ad campaign where "average woman" faces the rigors of Wall Street and its boy's club by treating herself to a pair of designer shoes. And long after the "SHE" campaign ends, the statue may continue to inspire if it stays as long as the bull has.]]>

  7. < ![CDATA[I'll admit I'm torn, as I think artistic intent does matter. But I also see the value in how the works have been appropriated (and I'm all for stealing from big corporations).]]>

  8. This advertising thing only matters to me if most people perceive it as an advertisement. Given that 99.9999% of the world has no idea who SHE is, I think we’re basically safe from anything shitty in lauding it.

  9. < ![CDATA[This advertising thing only matters to me if most people perceive it as an advertisement. Given that 99.9999% of the world has no idea who SHE is, I think we're basically safe from anything shitty in lauding it.]]>