I actually still can’t get to it.

Any Canadian folks in my circles want to weigh in on good places to live in the Great White North? I’m a web designer and my wife is a teacher. Our son is turning two soon. Someplace without absurd cost of living would be ideal.

Also, I have a heart condition, so need to see a cardiologist regularly and I take a lot of meds. Is healthcare actually better?

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_58229b95e4b0e80b02cdcdad

28 thoughts on “I actually still can’t get to it.

  1. Housing is expensive as hell in our cities right now, and we’re in a bit of a recession, but there’s usually opportunity in tech in Vancouver or Toronto. Calgary and Edmonton are probably the best for teachers, in terms of salary, and if oil prices recover, then they will be good for tech, too.

    Health care is maybe not as good as you hear, but it’s good. Provincial coverage takes care of all the basic stuff, and many people have access to relatively cheap employer plans for the extras (not nearly enough, in my opinion, but many do).

    Taxes are higher, because that money has to come from somewhere. Winters are hard in most parts of the country, but summers are usually pleasant, is maybe not as hot as you’re used to.

  2. Mark Delsing if your mom had German citizenship, that might actually be am easier course.

    Apparently the Internet ate my clarification post about healthcare, but the short version is that your cardiologist would probably be covered, but your prescriptions would not except through a buy-in drug plan. Those vary, but the one I have (Alberta Blue Cross) covers 75% of all prescription medications for me and my wife (and presumably our kids if we have any).

  3. Adam D I actually have a cousin in Vancouver who is a real estate agent, but I think his view of costs is a little warped. When I asked him about housing, he responded: “No, it’s not that bad. Half a million, a million. Not bad at all.” 😧

  4. Bask in my wisdom. (Please don’t. I am still technically a millennial.)

    Vancouver has a great deal of perks, but with it come with a lot of flaws. I’ll see what I can say here. Feel free to ask me further questions, as I’m listing things off the top of my head. Also, if anyone needs to call bullshit on any of this, please do, but know that these are my honest and genuine thoughts.

    1. People tend to say that Vancouverites are quite insular, not-very-friendly. I find this to be only somewhat true. We’re polite. We hold doors for you. We say please and thank you. We say excuse me if we need to get by someone on the bus. Amiable

    But we also are very shy. People don’t tend to spend longer in a conversation with a stranger than they have to. It’s dependent on the person, but this is certainly valid that it gives off the impression that we aren’t a “friendly” city. Very often, shyness is synonymous with rudeness. It’s kind of true.

    2. The housing market is stupid. Straight up. Meghan and I are both middling professionals. I am a waiter, she is a library tech. We make collectively around 70-80k a year. We have come to terms that we will probably never own a house unless we move away, either to the burbs or a different city entirely. That said, Burnaby, Port Moody, and New Westminster are a little more affordable (and they are cute) and they aren’t very far away.

    So, we rent. The rental market is stupid too! Tricky to find a place that isn’t overpriced (And I don’t mean market-value but quite literally overpriced.) But that doesn’t mean it is impossible. All of my friends rent, and for the most part, they have decent places for decent prices. You just have to be patient and a little lucky when looking for a place (also compromising as to location).

    3. It’s fucking beautiful here. Gorgeous views right in the city, beautiful hikes/walks just a short drive away (sometimes still in the city).

    There is a reason our stupid tourism commercials say “Super-Natural British Columbia”: You almost get fatigued by looking at cool mountains and shit if you go on a road trip.

    Every day that it isn’t raining here (which it rains here quite often, but not as much as media leads you to believe), I consider myself blessed that I live here. Sometimes that goes away as soon as I get on public transit, but still.

    4. Driving here isn’t that bad, but Vancouver drivers are kind of nuts. Luckily, our public transit here is half-decent, and we have our fair share of car-sharing companies for when I need to.

    5. Health care? When you have a broken leg or child birth without personal insurance, none of your medical bill comes out of your own pocket. On the other hand, waiting for an MRI can take months to years while on a waitlist (unless you have your own insurance plan). It’s not ideal, I’ll tell you that now, but almost everyone can afford and receive medical treatment here in the case of an emergency.

    6. Government closures of schools and problems with the school board can make things really difficult for parents. I can’t speak too much on this, so I suggest you look into it further, seeing as you have a little one.

    7. We are very diverse here in Vancouver.

    8. The restaurant/service scene here is pretty huge.

    9. I can’t speak on jobs really, as I have been in service for 15 years, and at my current job for 7. This is something someone else will have to answer. As far as I know, employment here is pretty decent.

    I hope that even a single shred of this helps you, Mark. Good luck.

  5. Amiable But we also are very shy. People don’t tend to spend longer in a conversation with a stranger than they have to. It’s dependent on the person, but this is certainly valid that it gives off the impression that we aren’t a “friendly” city. Very often, shyness is synonymous with rudeness. It’s kind of true. 2. The housing market is stupid. Straight up. Meghan and I are both middling professionals. I am a waiter, she is a library tech. We make collectively around 70-80k a year. We have come to terms that we will probably never own a house unless we move away, either to the burbs or a different city entirely. That said, Burnaby, Port Moody, and New Westminster are a little more affordable (and they are cute) and they aren’t very far away. So, we rent. The rental market is stupid too! Tricky to find a place that isn’t overpriced (And I don’t mean market-value but quite literally overpriced.) But that doesn’t mean it is impossible. All of my friends rent, and for the most part, they have decent places for decent prices. You just have to be patient and a little lucky when looking for a place (also compromising as to location). 3. It’s fucking beautiful here. Gorgeous views right in the city, beautiful hikes/walks just a short drive away (sometimes still in the city). There is a reason our stupid tourism commercials say “Super-Natural British Columbia”: You almost get fatigued by looking at cool mountains and shit if you go on a road trip. Every day that it isn’t raining here (which it rains here quite often, but not as much as media leads you to believe), I consider myself blessed that I live here. Sometimes that goes away as soon as I get on public transit, but still. 4. Driving here isn’t that bad, but Vancouver drivers are kind of nuts. Luckily, our public transit here is half-decent, and we have our fair share of car-sharing companies for when I need to. 5. Health care? When you have a broken leg or child birth without personal insurance, none of your medical bill comes out of your own pocket. On the other hand, waiting for an MRI can take months to years while on a waitlist (unless you have your own insurance plan). It’s not ideal, I’ll tell you that now, but almost everyone can afford and receive medical treatment here in the case of an emergency. 6. Government closures of schools and problems with the school board can make things really difficult for parents. I can’t speak too much on this, so I suggest you look into it further, seeing as you have a little one. 7. We are very diverse here in Vancouver. 8. The restaurant/service scene here is pretty huge. 9. I can’t speak on jobs really, as I have been in service for 15 years, and at my current job for 7. This is something someone else will have to answer. As far as I know, employment here is pretty decent. I hope that even a single shred of this helps you, Mark. Good luck.]]>