So, Scion 2nd edition… What do you doooo?

Seriously, would someone be able to give me an example of what a session of play might look like? I get that PCs are children of gods and have kewl powers, but what do they do in the game? Any overarching goals? Who opposes them and why? Why would a group of them be working together?

62 thoughts on “So, Scion 2nd edition… What do you doooo?

  1. Isn’t the default answer to “what do you dooooo?” usually just “whatever the GM decides”?

    I don’t know scion, I just assume these games are all from the same mold of “here’s a system, your GM will throw story at you”

  2. < ![CDATA[Isn't the default answer to "what do you dooooo?" usually just "whatever the GM decides"? I don't know scion, I just assume these games are all from the same mold of "here's a system, your GM will throw story at you"]]>

  3. Diplomatic conflicts are a pretty big focus of the game as I see it: brokering deals between factions that hate each other while instigators try to push them towards warfare, for example. Also large-scale family struggle like in the Mahābhāratam. Empire-building stuff, where you’re putting together a religion around you and your friends, is another fun way to spend your time. You should also be able to get some pretty fun sessions out of not-particularly-high-minded partying and troublemaking, like when the Monkey King caused havoc in Heaven or Nanabozho interfered with the lacrosse game.

  4. < ![CDATA[Diplomatic conflicts are a pretty big focus of the game as I see it: brokering deals between factions that hate each other while instigators try to push them towards warfare, for example. Also large-scale family struggle like in the Mahābhāratam. Empire-building stuff, where you’re putting together a religion around you and your friends, is another fun way to spend your time. You should also be able to get some pretty fun sessions out of not-particularly-high-minded partying and troublemaking, like when the Monkey King caused havoc in Heaven or Nanabozho interfered with the lacrosse game.]]>

  5. Yes, there are. Each pantheon is a faction with its own political position regarding its own members, other pantheons, and the titans. For example:
    • The devás are kind of the United States of the pantheons because they have so many worshippers and so much military power via their astras, although actually firing an astra at someone would be like detonating a nuclear weapon, so no one wants to do it. They have a really aggressive stance towards titans (or asuras, as they call them), even going so far as to characterize certain other entire pantheons (particularly the yazatas and æsir) as titans.
    • The òrìṣà and loa prioritize peaceful diplomacy in dealings with other pantheons, and they don’t believe in titans. They think the whole concept of titans is a made-up political ploy to allow aggressive pantheons to sanction or attack deities they don’t like.
    • The shén use the term “titan” the way Sīmǎ Qiān used the term “barbarian.” They acknowledge the existence of titans and are willing to go and fight them, but they’re also perfectly happy to hire and work with titans, even if titans don’t get jobs in the celestial bureaucracy that are as good as shén jobs. For example, they consider the devá King Yama (the most overworked of all the gods) to be a titan, but he still has the prestigious and important job of running their afterlife for them.

  6. < ![CDATA[Yes, there are. Each pantheon is a faction with its own political position regarding its own members, other pantheons, and the titans. For example: • The devás are kind of the United States of the pantheons because they have so many worshippers and so much military power via their astras, although actually firing an astra at someone would be like detonating a nuclear weapon, so no one wants to do it. They have a really aggressive stance towards titans (or asuras, as they call them), even going so far as to characterize certain other entire pantheons (particularly the yazatas and æsir) as titans. • The òrìṣà and loa prioritize peaceful diplomacy in dealings with other pantheons, and they don't believe in titans. They think the whole concept of titans is a made-up political ploy to allow aggressive pantheons to sanction or attack deities they don't like. • The shén use the term "titan" the way Sīmǎ Qiān used the term "barbarian." They acknowledge the existence of titans and are willing to go and fight them, but they're also perfectly happy to hire and work with titans, even if titans don't get jobs in the celestial bureaucracy that are as good as shén jobs. For example, they consider the devá King Yama (the most overworked of all the gods) to be a titan, but he still has the prestigious and important job of running their afterlife for them.]]>

  7. Robert Bohl So, that section hasn’t been written yet, but this is my expectation based on how we’ve chatted about it so far: The lead developer cut his teeth writing the how-to-storytell sections for older WW games. There will definitely be explicit instructions on how to structure large-scale story arcs covering character growth from hero to demigod to god, and the construction of pantheons and legends. Session structure will have explicit guidance, although there won’t be a scene economy like in Mouse Guard, Shinobigami, or MY 1e, for example. The game will probably still work if you throw out the scene structure advice since the old-school White Wolf players will probably do that anyway. But you know me, I like structure, and the lead developer has often described his ideal system state for this game as “a tradgame which Mendez will still be happy to play,” so my whining about making narrative arcs explicit within the course of a session as well will probably bear some fruit.

  8. < ![CDATA[Robert Bohl So, that section hasn't been written yet, but this is my expectation based on how we've chatted about it so far: The lead developer cut his teeth writing the how-to-storytell sections for older WW games. There will definitely be explicit instructions on how to structure large-scale story arcs covering character growth from hero to demigod to god, and the construction of pantheons and legends. Session structure will have explicit guidance, although there won't be a scene economy like in Mouse Guard, Shinobigami, or MY 1e, for example. The game will probably still work if you throw out the scene structure advice since the old-school White Wolf players will probably do that anyway. But you know me, I like structure, and the lead developer has often described his ideal system state for this game as "a tradgame which Mendez will still be happy to play," so my whining about making narrative arcs explicit within the course of a session as well will probably bear some fruit.]]>

  9. I usually run it like Percy Jackson, minus all the “Greece = Western Civilization = The Only True Humanity” horror.

    So young pretty people with angst and kewl powers, running around trying to stop giant asshole evil titans while dealing with the almost as giant of asshole “good” gods.

    A typical session usually involves trying to deal with the asshole gods, trying to figure out how you feel about the motives of your divine legacy, flirting with each other, and punching something evil in the face so hard that it gives Jörmungand a nose bleed.

  10. < ![CDATA[I usually run it like Percy Jackson, minus all the "Greece = Western Civilization = The Only True Humanity" horror. So young pretty people with angst and kewl powers, running around trying to stop giant asshole evil titans while dealing with the almost as giant of asshole "good" gods. A typical session usually involves trying to deal with the asshole gods, trying to figure out how you feel about the motives of your divine legacy, flirting with each other, and punching something evil in the face so hard that it gives Jörmungand a nose bleed.]]>

  11. Oh, also I know that Geoffrey McVey is doing some work on weaving in mythic elements, for those who actually want the game to have some mythology in it.

    Instead of, you know, my giant soap opera campaign arcs that are really all about the fact that Loki still isn’t over the fact that Sif married Thor instead of him and is taking out it on all of you.

  12. < ![CDATA[Oh, also I know that Geoffrey McVey is doing some work on weaving in mythic elements, for those who actually want the game to have some mythology in it. Instead of, you know, my giant soap opera campaign arcs that are really all about the fact that Loki still isn't over the fact that Sif married Thor instead of him and is taking out it on all of you.]]>

  13. < ![CDATA[Titans basically want the world back and don't care about humans. They just care about being awesome and godly. So they're always up to no good in the neighborhood, trying to destroy humanity, bring about chaos, consolidate power, etc.]]>

  14. Adventuring together is kind of the pantheon equivalent of dating. Some of the extant pantheons formed when heroes or gods from disparate origins had an adventure together and decided they wanted to keep hanging out. If you’re a god, sending your kid on a slaydate with a scion from a different pantheon is, at best, the beginning of an important friendship which gets you backup when the Titans come for you, and at worst, a good way to learn that another pantheon has it in for you and how.

  15. < ![CDATA[Adventuring together is kind of the pantheon equivalent of dating. Some of the extant pantheons formed when heroes or gods from disparate origins had an adventure together and decided they wanted to keep hanging out. If you're a god, sending your kid on a slaydate with a scion from a different pantheon is, at best, the beginning of an important friendship which gets you backup when the Titans come for you, and at worst, a good way to learn that another pantheon has it in for you and how.]]>