TFW a gorgeous shiny game gets an honorable mention from the Indie RPG Awards but your kneejerk acquisitionist urges are foiled because they only sell their game in stores.

Yes yes, support your friendly local buggywhip store etc etc.

http://burning-games.com/faith-sci-fi-rpg-boardgame-the-game/

26 thoughts on “TFW a gorgeous shiny game gets an honorable mention from the Indie RPG Awards but your kneejerk acquisitionist urges…

  1. Also: Where’s the line you draw for yourself? Cards? Chits? I’m iffy on chits but you know, I basically use fucking chits in the form of glass beads or whatever.

    Cards I think are enormously useful in some applications, and are a clearly better form factor than other options in those cases. All the cards in MY0? The Torchbearer and Mouse Card cards? The portraits in Night Witches and The Warren and Epyllion?

    The player boards for Faith do kind of look like overkill, but I’ll bet the vibe works well if you want the game to feel boardgame-y. Which, you know…maybe? I think it’s a legit design goal.

  2. < ![CDATA[Also: Where's the line you draw for yourself? Cards? Chits? I'm iffy on chits but you know, I basically use fucking chits in the form of glass beads or whatever. Cards I think are enormously useful in some applications, and are a clearly better form factor than other options in those cases. All the cards in MY0? The Torchbearer and Mouse Card cards? The portraits in Night Witches and The Warren and Epyllion? The player boards for Faith do kind of look like overkill, but I'll bet the vibe works well if you want the game to feel boardgame-y. Which, you know…maybe? I think it’s a legit design goal.]]>

  3. How do you feel about FFGs like Force of Destiny? Are gimmick dice a turn off?

    If they help with procedure speed I’m fine with it. If anything I wish TB had more cards so I could remember that backpacks were a factor in fighter and dungeoneer tests.

    But heavy game component requirements do cause tension for me. More materials means higher barrier to entry in some ways. Less likely to see players pick up the game themselves.

  4. < ![CDATA[How do you feel about FFGs like Force of Destiny? Are gimmick dice a turn off? If they help with procedure speed I'm fine with it. If anything I wish TB had more cards so I could remember that backpacks were a factor in fighter and dungeoneer tests. But heavy game component requirements do cause tension for me. More materials means higher barrier to entry in some ways. Less likely to see players pick up the game themselves.]]>

  5. Paul Beakley I guess I’m still figuring out where the line is, since this whole concept is pretty newish.

    I think that cards are generally fine; the MG cards work great for running conflicts and help make the process more transparent. But, I do like that the cards are not required. Even in MY0, you don’t need them, do you?

    “Make it feel boardgame-y” is interesting; I hadn’t thought about that. Not sure that’s much of a selling point for me, though I suppose it would depend on the game.

  6. < ![CDATA[Paul Beakley I guess I'm still figuring out where the line is, since this whole concept is pretty newish. I think that cards are generally fine; the MG cards work great for running conflicts and help make the process more transparent. But, I do like that the cards are not required. Even in MY0, you don’t need them, do you?
    “Make it feel boardgame-y” is interesting; I hadn’t thought about that. Not sure that’s much of a selling point for me, though I suppose it would depend on the game.]]>

  7. Aaron Berger FFG dice are a huge turn-off for me. I have been assured by various trustworthy folks that they are indeed cool and do things you could not do with a standard set of dice. I don’t know that I see much reason for it as a design decision beyond “Force people to use our dice,” or at least their app.

    But that could be me being curmudgeonly. I mean, I have no problem with the Feat Die in The One Ring, but again, at least they are not required — you can use a regular d12 if you want.

  8. < ![CDATA[Aaron Berger FFG dice are a huge turn-off for me. I have been assured by various trustworthy folks that they are indeed cool and do things you could not do with a standard set of dice. I don't know that I see much reason for it as a design decision beyond “Force people to use our dice,” or at least their app.
    But that could be me being curmudgeonly. I mean, I have no problem with the Feat Die in The One Ring, but again, at least they are not required — you can use a regular d12 if you want.]]>

  9. But the character boards in Faith… Lordy, I cannot imagine enjoying hunting through a pile of chits just to find a “2” to put next to my PC’s Piloting skill.

    Honestly, I am reminded of a game in playlets a guy one ran for me, and he used little chips and glass beads to track everything — and it was a freaking disaster. “I’m just trying to make things simple.” No, dude, having to track six piles of tchochkeys is not simple.

  10. < ![CDATA[But the character boards in Faith… Lordy, I cannot imagine enjoying hunting through a pile of chits just to find a “2” to put next to my PC’s Piloting skill.
    Honestly, I am reminded of a game in playlets a guy one ran for me, and he used little chips and glass beads to track everything — and it was a freaking disaster. “I’m just trying to make things simple.” No, dude, having to track six piles of tchochkeys is not simple.]]>

  11. The more gimmicky things are, for me, the better. Give me a thousand gimmicks, more gimmicks, I can’t get enough of em. Please god no more games with a character sheet and I’m rolling a funny shaped die.

  12. < ![CDATA[The more gimmicky things are, for me, the better. Give me a thousand gimmicks, more gimmicks, I can't get enough of em. Please god no more games with a character sheet and I'm rolling a funny shaped die.]]>

  13. The thing I really dig about printed components is that they’re a bit of the gamespace that I don’t have to fabricate myself. Like, it’s interesting: in the boardgame world, print-and-play games are a novel way of selling games to people for whom shipping would be cost-prohibitive, and they can also be a way for gamers to try out a boardgame or card game.

    In RPGs, print-and-play gaming is the norm. You print out all of the character sheets and other components that you’re going to use in play, sometimes including reference sheets, and you assemble it all yourself.

    Considering how much usability physical stuff can add to a game, I’m generally in favor of RPGs exploring this space.

  14. < ![CDATA[The thing I really dig about printed components is that they're a bit of the gamespace that I don't have to fabricate myself. Like, it's interesting: in the boardgame world, print-and-play games are a novel way of selling games to people for whom shipping would be cost-prohibitive, and they can also be a way for gamers to try out a boardgame or card game. In RPGs, print-and-play gaming is the norm. You print out all of the character sheets and other components that you're going to use in play, sometimes including reference sheets, and you assemble it all yourself. Considering how much usability physical stuff can add to a game, I'm generally in favor of RPGs exploring this space.]]>