4 thoughts on “I just read an Atlantic article about the recent DC superhero movies that, in referring to the Justice League, used…

  1. Both of the Big Two make me pretty sad.  Marvel has Disney’s savvy helping them out, which accounts for a lot, but otherwise they’re missing a lot of opportunities or half shooting themselves in the foot as they go.  DC, however… can’t really figure out what makes them successful when they succeed, nor what they’re doing wrong when they fail.  “Make everything grimdark like dark Batman” isn’t actually going to work out like they hope. (On the comics side, “Fire all the women” semi-regular purges isn’t helping them either).

  2. < ![CDATA[Both of the Big Two make me pretty sad.  Marvel has Disney's savvy helping them out, which accounts for a lot, but otherwise they're missing a lot of opportunities or half shooting themselves in the foot as they go.  DC, however... can't really figure out what makes them successful when they succeed, nor what they're doing wrong when they fail.  "Make everything grimdark like dark Batman" isn't actually going to work out like they hope. (On the comics side, "Fire all the women" semi-regular purges isn't helping them either).]]>

  3. Mark Delsing and Craig Hatler  If you look only at the idea of superheroes fighting together in team-ups it’s even earlier. But the Avengers doesn’t mean only that. Lee and Kirby really changed the way supergroups were written, and the first supergroup that wasn’t simply a periodic team up (with the writer splitting them off in separate chapter as soon as possible to avoid having them fight together) was arguably the Fantastic Four.
    The Avenger started as the Marvel equivalent of the JLA but became much more than that very early, and by the time Scarlet and Pietro joined the group it was already something never seen before at DC.  And it’s this group dynamic that made the Avengers movies succesfull.

    So, if the Justice League movie will go back the late 50s concept of a supergroup (and it’s possible, looking at the way Warner seems fixed on the “gods among mortal” concept) yes, it’s a model that precedes Marvel. But if they will try to make an “avengers” movie with their heroes… well, they will follow Marvel’s model.

  4. < ![CDATA[Mark Delsing and Craig Hatler  If you look only at the idea of superheroes fighting together in team-ups it's even earlier. But the Avengers doesn't mean only that. Lee and Kirby really changed the way supergroups were written, and the first supergroup that wasn't simply a periodic team up (with the writer splitting them off in separate chapter as soon as possible to avoid having them fight together) was arguably the Fantastic Four. The Avenger started as the Marvel equivalent of the JLA but became much more than that very early, and by the time Scarlet and Pietro joined the group it was already something never seen before at DC.  And it's this group dynamic that made the Avengers movies succesfull. So, if the Justice League movie will go back the late 50s concept of a supergroup (and it's possible, looking at the way Warner seems fixed on the "gods among mortal" concept) yes, it's a model that precedes Marvel. But if they will try to make an "avengers" movie with their heroes... well, they will follow Marvel's model.]]>