let’s be honest though, millennial hate is totally a thing rich folks started because they’re pissed that we have really unpredictable consumer habits and it isn’t as easy to get us to buy into stuff, so they’re mad we aren’t just money giving/traditional economy supporting machines like they expected us to be

Millennials do not cope well with meaningless busy work so their boss looks better. They don’t cope with being talked down to or not being assisted by their boss when they have a problem. They do not deal well with their innovative ideas being shut down because “that’s not how we do it here.” and I don’t see how any of those things is a problem.

http://geekincognito.tumblr.com/post/144209758578/anightvaleintern-yolandaash-teapotsahoy

44 thoughts on “let’s be honest though, millennial hate is totally a thing rich folks started because they’re pissed that we have…

  1. Emphasis on they don’t cope and they don’t deal well. I realize millennial bashing is not in favor in my circles and the word “entitled” throws up a red flag, but I’ve honestly never seen people so inclined to avoid doing work and so petulant about paying their dues than when we hire upper 20 to low 30 somethings. Every basic task is beneath them, no matter that’s its core to their job description. My boss just cashed in an absurd number of chips to get a 31 year old a promotion and a 10% raise in a year when no one at my firm got any raise and my boss hasn’t had one in 8 years. His response was “why’d it take so long and I was expecting more”.

    Meaningless busy work so their boss looks better? That’s called work. That’s why you have a job. This crazy expectation of being fulfilled at work is off the charts ridiculous. You have a hobby to feel fulfilled. You have a job to pay the bills.

    Millennial hate isn’t a consumer thing. It’s a shut up, put away the phone and do some damn work thing.

  2. Ralph Mazza A few questions present themselves:

    Why was no one else getting raises or promotions? Where is the money going?

    Why are you so accepting of having your time wasted? If you’re paid the same to proverbially twiddle your thumbs, why are you at work as many hours as you are?

    Why do you consider a job to have to be onerous, to the point that it cannot be fulfilling? Why are you accepting that?

  3. Why was no one else getting raises or promotions? Where is the money going? Why are you so accepting of having your time wasted? If you’re paid the same to proverbially twiddle your thumbs, why are you at work as many hours as you are? Why do you consider a job to have to be onerous, to the point that it cannot be fulfilling? Why are you accepting that?]]>

  4. Except none of those questions are relevant. An employer is paying me money. Period. They own my time. That’s what a job is. You sell your time to another and they use that time for whatever legal purpose they want. If I don’t like it I leave. If I can’t leave, I suck it up.

    Because this is life, not fantasy land.

  5. I feel like this is all in the eye of the beholder, because I work with a number of people in the 20-30 age group, and they’re all at least as hard-working as me. I wouldn’t say any of those generalizations apply at all.

    Generation theories are a very poor way to look at the world.

  6. You’re right. Youth culture in the 1980s was mostly identical to youth culture in the 1960s which was mostly identical to youth culture in the 1940s. They all listened to the same music and watched the same TV shows and everything. Because clearly that’s true.

  7. We are all a product of our upbringing. And that includes media consumed. And you know that because otherwise we wouldn’t care about inclusive representation in our media or awards shows.

    It also includes parental techniques that were or weren’t in fashion. It includes then current school pedagogies. It includes what games were played and how much unsupervised activities kids were allowed to have. It includes the frequency of having a stay at home parent or being a “latch-key” kid. It includes how far removed from being immigrants your family is, and 1000 more things besides.

    Those things have a profound impact on who we grow up to be. Including our work ethic. And the pattern of those things across a subculture over the course of a decade provide context to a generation.

    This is so self evident that it’s boggling to suggest otherwise.

  8. Ralph Mazza You are free to sell your time. Most of us instead sell our labor, often defined by the time span we are required to do it in, but not always. If your employer is content to merely pay you for your time, well, then you have a deal that’s… well, kinda terrible for both, because your employer gets very little for their money, and you’re stuck with understimulating makework.

    Me, I have hours on my work schedule, but what actually gets me my paycheck is the work I do, not the time spent sitting on my chair.

    So my questions are quite relevant, and I wonder what your answers will be. Or are you content to settle for being a chair-filler?

  9. labor, often defined by the time span we are required to do it in, but not always. If your employer is content to merely pay you for your time, well, then you have a deal that’s… well, kinda terrible for both, because your employer gets very little for their money, and you’re stuck with understimulating makework. Me, I have hours on my work schedule, but what actually gets me my paycheck is the work I do, not the time spent sitting on my chair. So my questions are quite relevant, and I wonder what your answers will be. Or are you content to settle for being a chair-filler?]]>

  10. Now you’re just playing semantics games. You provide no labor without time, even when employers pay by the piece it’s still ultimately the time you put into the piece they’re paying for. Most employees aren’t paid by the piece, they’re paid by time, either directly, by punching time cards, or indirectly by salary and corporate policy as to work hour expectations.

    As to what an employer gets for paying for time, well that’s why there are supervisors and keystroke loggers, report metrics, and other techniques to ensure employees aren’t chair sitters. Of course all this is so rudimentary that I have to assume you already know this. Which means you’re trying to make some Socratic point with your questions.

    But since you won’t actually say what that point is I’m left to guess that you’re dreaming about some fairy tale land where everyone earns a living wage not for doing the work that needs done, but only for the work they feel fulfilled doing and there are no bosses or performance reports or production goals to harsh the zen. Because that attitude is one I see regularly from 20 somethings and almost never from 50 somethings.

  11. Ralph Mazza Semantics are basic to language. Any time we speak we play semantics games. But let me explain it a bit:

    Time is not the same as work. Most of us sell our work, often (but not always) measured by time spent on the task. Can you follow that? If I am salaried based on my output, I am not selling my time, I’m selling my labor. If I am salaried based on how long I’m standing at the assembly line, you might argue I’m selling my time, but only because it’s used as a measurement of the work I do.

    Which leads me to a prime point here: You get what you measure. If you measure employees by the time spent, you will get that, not high output. If you measure their keystrokes, you’ll get lots of typing. If you measure their results sensibly, you will get results.

    Your arguments reek of an old, outdated way of thinking that mostly produces misery and stress, rather than productivity and results. Most jobs that are adequately done by robots are going to robots, these days, and more and more jobs can adequately be done by robots.

    Millennials see the writing on the wall. They were born into a future that looks like that. They don’t want to be laid off some assembly line (whether it makes widgets or unread paperwork) when a robot comes along that can do it. They don’t want to be robots, in the first place.

    My dad, rest his soul, took an assembly line job when he lost the job he loved – a job that he felt fulfilled and happy doing, and which gave meaning to his efforts. Ten years later, he took early retirement the moment he was able, when he turned 60. Do you think that was a coincidence?

  12. You get what you measure. If you measure employees by the time spent, you will get that, not high output. If you measure their keystrokes, you’ll get lots of typing. If you measure their results sensibly, you will get results. Your arguments reek of an old, outdated way of thinking that mostly produces misery and stress, rather than productivity and results. Most jobs that are adequately done by robots are going to robots, these days, and more and more jobs can adequately be done by robots. Millennials see the writing on the wall. They were born into a future that looks like that. They don’t want to be laid off some assembly line (whether it makes widgets or unread paperwork) when a robot comes along that can do it. They don’t want to be robots, in the first place. My dad, rest his soul, took an assembly line job when he lost the job he loved – a job that he felt fulfilled and happy doing, and which gave meaning to his efforts. Ten years later, he took early retirement the moment he was able, when he turned 60. Do you think that was a coincidence?]]>

  13. None of which is relevant. You can put whatever imagery you want to try to justify it, but slackers not doing their job because they don’t feel good about it, are still slackers not doing their job. When 50 year olds can work circles around 26 year olds and do it with a minimum of whining and bitching (or more accurately, while restricting their whining and bitching to appropriate venue for it, like the pub after hours), the difference has immediate impact on productivity.

    I don’t care what future they see, I don’t want to get replaced by a robot either. Tough. Today I gave you a job to do and you need to stfu and do it. Period. Because that’s why you have the job in the first place.

  14. To be clear, I’m not disagreeing with your points. In fact, I probably agree with most of them. When I say they aren’t relevant, I mean that literally. Because high level philosophical thinking about the nature of labor isn’t relevant to the daily activity of actually getting the job done. When there’s a three feet tall stack of paperwork that needs to get scanned, that’s not the time to wax eloquent about efforts having meaning. I don’t care that it’s a mind numbing boring job far beneath your skills, it has to get done. I don’t care that you went tens of thousands of dollars in debt to get a degree and now you spending half a day shoving paper into a slot and making sure it’s readable and gets stored in the right directory, it has to get done. And until the company installs a robot to do it, it has to get done by a person, and that person is you. So fucking do it, and do it right so other people don’t have to go back and fix it, and don’t dilly dally and take all day about it because there are plenty of other things that also need done.

    That’s it. That’s reality. Doesn’t matter if the job sucks. Doesn’t matter if that’s wasted talent. Doesn’t matter if the corporation is foolish or locked into old fashioned thinking. None of that matters today, when there’s a stack of paperwork that needs scanned and the fucking millennial is rolling their eyes and sighing heavily about having to do it. Because that attitude fucks it up for everybody else. It isn’t just them being miserable, it’s about them being a wrench in the works for the whole operation and the other people who don’t get paid any extra for picking up their slack.

  15. Ralph Mazza Like I said, sit down, shut up, never complain, act like it’s aaalll fine. Or you’re being a disruptive little monster because you… have actual brain activity, I guess.

    ‘Reality’ sucks and needs to be changed. It’s happily something millennials are good at. My generation (at least, the one I was born into) never changed a damn thing in their lives. The one before it seems intent on sitting on everything until it breaks or they die of old damn age, and anyone who has a complaint about that is, as I said, a disruptive little monster.

    Don’t get all huffy that people don’t want to stay in the little stupid boxes they’re forced into.

  16. Ease down, everybody.

    My main interest in the linked post was the issue of millennial frustrating traditional marketing; this supports what I believe about the empowering abilities of the Internet. I love anything that frustrates corporations.

    The idea of wanting work to be meaningful at least as old as the Baby Boomers; I know I’ve been reading about it being a source of angst for at least that long. And I’m sympathetic to the idea, because I’d hate to be on my deathbed and think, “Well, at least I earned a living.” Honestly, I’m with Bucky Fuller in that I think the idea that everyone has to earn a living is absurd.

    IMO, most companies make a lot of money for a small number of people while adding no value whatsoever to the world. If they’re going to produce nothing more than crap that goes straight from factory to landfill or pointless media noise, the least they can do is pay people well and make sure they have enjoyable lives.

    Also, I work with plenty of millennial in my job, and they are all as awesome and terrible as anyone else I’ve ever worked with.

  17. has to earn a living is absurd. IMO, most companies make a lot of money for a small number of people while adding no value whatsoever to the world. If they’re going to produce nothing more than crap that goes straight from factory to landfill or pointless media noise, the least they can do is pay people well and make sure they have enjoyable lives. Also, I work with plenty of millennial in my job, and they are all as awesome and terrible as anyone else I’ve ever worked with.]]>