I give Fender credit for hitting a pretty reasonable price point for the guitar ($1799), and the amp is basically in the ballpark of their reissue and some custom stuff ($2399).

Fender is kind of like Taco Bell; a tiny handful of ingredients that keep getting re-used but with different names. The only unique feature I can see here is the contoured neck heel — something that a lot of folk think should be standard on guitars anyway. The neck radius is the same as lot of contemporary strats (like my old Clapton model), as 9.5″ seems thew smallest anyone will tolerate these days. The videos say two of the pickups are custom versions of the Fat 50, while the third is a Dimarzio FS-1, which you can get online for $50.

It’s sort of ironic, given that the Edge’s sounds is mostly in his amps and effects, and he rarely does any sort of customization; he likes guitars from the 60s and 70s, like most players. Very few of the guitars he uses are truly rare birds (and the few that are are Gibsons).

I’d be curious to see if they offer a Custom Shop version of this; I’d be more likely to seek that out than a production model, though I wouldn’t rule one out entirely.

What it boils down to is that Leo originally intended the Strat to be an affordable, easy-to-assemble guitar, and virtually every famous strat is something that rolled off the assembly line (like the normally-considered-crappy 70s starts the Edge loves); it’s the players that made them famous. Fender knows this, and so what you really pay for with these models is the artist’s signature.

http://www.fender.com/the-edge

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