6 thoughts on “Just starring and not backing this for now, but the physical artifact looks gorgeous. Why are the Spaniards and the…

  1. This game is screaming my name at 10,000 decibels…but every time I almost succumb…I remember…BRP one of the most heinously broken game systems of all time…the poster child of System Doesn’t Matter…quite possibly the game system I loathe more than any other…

    …and I weep for what might have been…

  2. < ![CDATA[This game is screaming my name at 10,000 decibels...but every time I almost succumb...I remember...BRP one of the most heinously broken game systems of all time...the poster child of System Doesn't Matter...quite possibly the game system I loathe more than any other... ...and I weep for what might have been...]]>

  3. Off the cuff, in the order they occur to me:

    Whiff tastic. You are a highly trained whatever…make a roll, you have a 45% chance to succeed.

    Bland. Oh so very bland. It doesn’t need to be. Pendragon shows how you can make even a system as boring as BRP interesting. But since after D&D my GMing included Fantasy Wargaming, Top Secret, Ars Magica,and Cyberpunk, the excruciating vanilla-ness of BRP was eyegougingly boring.

    Linear probability.

    The false precision of Percentiles. As if somehow it were possible to model roleplaying to such an extent that there was a meaningful difference between 43% and 46%. At least Pendragon had the sense to realize this and just go with a d20. Still whiff tastic, still linear, but at least it didn’t add Percentiles to its list of problems.

    Shallow dice…as in the opposite of rich dice. There is one reason and one only to use Percentiles and that’s to do something interesting with the fact you are rolling 2 dice. Top Secret SI used the 1s die for hit location or other randomizers and the 10s for degree of success. Unknown Armies had the flip flop mechanic. Do something with it…or why bother.

    And ultimately after all of the bad math and the easily ignored blandness it was one of the original “get out of the way” systems teaching a whole generation of fans that system doesn’t matter, because a good GM will make the game work no matter how heinously broken it is.

  4. < ![CDATA[Off the cuff, in the order they occur to me: Whiff tastic. You are a highly trained whatever...make a roll, you have a 45% chance to succeed. Bland. Oh so very bland. It doesn't need to be. Pendragon shows how you can make even a system as boring as BRP interesting. But since after D&D my GMing included Fantasy Wargaming, Top Secret, Ars Magica,and Cyberpunk, the excruciating vanilla-ness of BRP was eyegougingly boring. Linear probability. The false precision of Percentiles. As if somehow it were possible to model roleplaying to such an extent that there was a meaningful difference between 43% and 46%. At least Pendragon had the sense to realize this and just go with a d20. Still whiff tastic, still linear, but at least it didn't add Percentiles to its list of problems. Shallow dice...as in the opposite of rich dice. There is one reason and one only to use Percentiles and that's to do something interesting with the fact you are rolling 2 dice. Top Secret SI used the 1s die for hit location or other randomizers and the 10s for degree of success. Unknown Armies had the flip flop mechanic. Do something with it...or why bother. And ultimately after all of the bad math and the easily ignored blandness it was one of the original "get out of the way" systems teaching a whole generation of fans that system doesn't matter, because a good GM will make the game work no matter how heinously broken it is.]]>